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Thinking About Moving to the Middle? Think Again…

17 Feb

The Truthinator has been thinking about this thing about being in the middle of the road when it comes to Theological issues. Too often, in my opinion, we see the idea that the best way to operate is to move toward the middle of a discussion to look for common ground with your discussion counterpart(s) being deployed. This approach may work well in a Rotary Club meeting but is it the best way to conduct Theological debate? Let’s look at what happens to people who move to the middle in other aspects of life…

A tennis player who plays in the middle of the court will get caught in the net.

A golfer who shoots ‘par’ will miss the cut at most tournaments.

A football player who stands in the middle of a scrimmage setup will be penalized for being offsides.

A hockey player who plays the middle of the ice will miss 99% of the action of the game.

A rodeo clown who stands in the middle of the ring will get stuck by a bull.

An ice-skater who stays in the middle of the pond will risk falling through the ice.

A fowl hunter who stands in the middle of the hunting field will be shot.

A mailman who stays in the middle of the road will never be able to deliver the mail.

An antelope in the middle of a pack of lions will be eaten.

So it appears that the best way to go about life is to stay around its edges!

Now for the lesson. Where in the Bible is finding middle ground (compromise) in a Theological discussion talked about as being a good thing? Nowhere. In the Garden of Eden, Satan suggested that Eve compromise the clear and precise command that God had given. She did and the rest is history. All throughout the Old Testament, God’s chosen people continually moved away from the crystal-clear instructions God had given them in order to get closer to the pagan activities of other nations (moving toward the middle). How did this work out? Not well. In the New Testament, how many times did Jesus suggest that the best way to resolve differences with the Pharisees was to find middle ground with them and begin negotiations there? Zero. How many times did Jesus say that He had a guaranteed way to Heaven but there were other options if people desired to take a more ecumenical path? Zero. How many times did the New Testament writers under the guidance of the Holy Spirit say that Theological differences with those who teach a different message than the apostles should be met in the middle to agree on a compromise in order to keep the peace? Zero. And lastly, what does God say about those who are neither hot nor cold (those in the Theological middle)? They make Him sick at His stomach (Rev 3).

Wow! You would think that God must have meant what He said in His book, wouldn’t you? Compromise, moving to the middle, striking a deal, finding something you can agree on when you cannot agree on dogmatic Bible teaching and other such euphemisms for backing off the standard established by God in His word are NEVER mentioned.

Read the Bible, believe the Bible, do what the Bible says.

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1 Comment

Posted by on February 17, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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One response to “Thinking About Moving to the Middle? Think Again…

  1. Ali

    February 18, 2011 at 9:46 pm

    “I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! So, because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth.” Revelation 3:15-16

    Perhaps you had better stay away from the middle! :-)

     

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